Introduction The Landscape Research Design Reports 1999 Field Season 2000 Field Season 2002 Field Season
  Horse and rider fibulaBettina Arnold
  A Landscape of Ancestors: The Heuneburg Archaeological Project

Dagger, Grave 3 - Tumulus 17

The metal finds from the intact burials in Tumulus 17 (1, 3, and 4) are currently in the process of being restored at the Landesdenkmalamt Baden-Württemberg, Außenstelle Tübingen. We would like to acknowledge the generous support of the LDA-Tübingen, and particularly the long-standing commitment to the project of Prof. Dr. Hartmann Reim, in the restoration effort. Special thanks are due to student intern Ina Neese (FHTW Berlin), who prepared the report, and LDA Conservator Tanja Kress, who directed the conservation of the dagger. Images are from the report submitted by Ina Neese in January, 2003.

The dagger from Grave 3 has been mostly restored, and preliminary results of the restoration can be viewed in the images below. Restoration work on the sword from Grave 1 has also begun, and images of the work on that piece will be made available on this site as we receive and process additional photographs.

Comprehensive view of the dagger from Grave 3, Tumulus 17 1a
Comprehensive view of the dagger from Grave 3, Tumulus 17 1b
These two comprehensive views of the dagger were produced by digitally combining several composite photographs made by the LDA-Tübingen photographer. The lighter wooden scabbard fragments can be clearly distinguished from the darker iron of the blade, scabbard chape and handle area. The wood has not yet been identified, nor is it clear yet whether the scabbard was made in two pieces or a single piece, although the former is more likely. The light yellow areas overlying the wood and iron in several places, including on the handle and on and near the two areas on the scabbard that probably represent corroded iron rings for suspension of the dagger from a belt at the waist, are apparently remnants of the leather that sheathed the scabbard and handle.


Dagger seen end-on from the iron pommel at the end of the handle 2a
  Dagger embedded in the soil matrix, showing terminal end of the scabbard chape 2b
In 2a the dagger is seen end-on from the iron pommel at the end of the handle. The flattened area indicates where the handle was in contact with the clothing worn by the deceased; the dagger was found in situ angled across what would have been the right hip. 2b shows the dagger still embedded in the soil matrix removed en bloc from the grave; the plastic wrap and plaster rim can be seen at the edges of the bloc. The terminal end of the scabbard chape is shown, clearly made of some sort of organic material, most likely wood.


Iron concretion representing one of the suspension rings 3a   Close-up view of the other likely suspension ring closer 3b
In 3a the iron concretion representing one of the suspension rings at the scabbard chape end of the dagger is shown. The light yellow material adhering to the concretion is probably leather. 3b shows a close-up view of the other likely suspension ring closer to the handle end of the dagger. Here too leather has been partially preserved.


Textile pseudomorphs on the iron pommel of the dagger 4a   Textile pseudomorphs on the iron pommel of the dagger 4b
Textile pseudomorphs on the iron pommel of the dagger 4c   Textile pseudomorphs on the iron pommel of the dagger 4d
In 4a the iron pommel of the dagger is shown in a close-up view. The area that was in contact with the deceased's clothing has retained pseudomorphic textile structures. 4b shows the same area at higher magnification, and a herringbone pattern can be seen. 4c and 4d show additional textile pseudomorphs from this area on the dagger.

 

|  Home Page  |  Courses  |  Curriculum Vitae  |
|  Gender Conference  |  Public Lectures  |  Anthropology Links  |

© 2000 Bettina Arnold, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Design: Homer Hruby, Last Updated: March 18, 2003