<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="1252"%> 2005Design1
. .
HOP AND SINK SWIMMING PATTERN IN CYCLOPS In 1978 Miquel Alcaraz visited the Strickler lab. One of the projects was to estimate the energy required for swimming by copepods. We attached a male Cyclops scutifer to a bristle from a tooth brush which was attached to the small spring of the escapement of a former alarm clock. When the Cyclops hopped it pulled on the spring. Knowing the spring constant we could estimate the work done
.
This animated GIF file was created by photographing frame by frame the original high-speed film. The film was made at 500 frames per second. 18 frames cover one hop of this Cyclops (36 msec total duration). Each frame was digitized and added to the animation
.

.
Cyclops show the typical hop and sink swimming pattern. They execute about one hop per second and hop about one millimeter each time
.
One additional result was that we found resilin, a rubber-like protein, to be part of the locomotion structures. In fleas, for example, resilin acts like a spring enabling the animal to execute fast and powerful jumps
.
Alcaraz & Strickler, 1988, Hydrobiologia 167/168: 409-414
.
Back to Copepod Central
© STRICKLER, UWM 2005 back to Strickler Central