<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="1252"%> 2005Design1
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FEEDING ON VERY LARGE PARTICLES Observations suggest that calanoid copepods are not "filter feeders" and may handle food particles one at the time. In order to test this hypothesis we want to see whether Eucalanus pileatus can handle a large particle and flip it over until it can ingest it
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We used a quartz glass particle as food item and "served" the animal this particle using a micro-pipette. We also made this particle very "interesting" to the animal by coating it with beta-carotin. And: we took a particle, which was too large to fit into the mouth of the copepod. Hence, whatever position the particle is in, it will not fit. However, the smell is so convincing that the animal tries again and again, flipping it over according to a "plan"
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To observe these motions we used a LOCAM high speed 16 mm camera at 500 frames per second. The color film was then translated to video. This observation was made at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). Drs. P. Gentien and H. Crenshaw (an exchange student at that time) with Ms. E. Hing Fay and Mr. P. Dixon helped R. Strickler to get this clip and many others
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Eucalanus pileatus, from the Coral Sea east of Australia, is the test animal. Top, left would be its head, bottom right its abdomen. All we can see in the picture are the mouth parts. The one most on the bottom is the maxilliped. The next one up from the bottom the maxilla. Observe the motions of the maxilla. It is very active!
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Strickler, J.R. 1984. Sticky water: a selective force in copepod evolution. In: D.G. Meyers and J.R. Strickler [Eds.], Trophic Interactions within Aquatic Ecosystems, Westview Press, 187-239
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