Excerpts from the Civil War Pension Application File of Alvin H. Ingalls

Affidavit of Alvin H. Ingalls: 

State of Pennsylvania

County of Tioga

On this 21st day of March 1870, before me D. L. Deane Clerk of the Orphaus Court, in and for the County aforesaid, personally appeared Alvin H. Ingalls, who being by me duly sworn according to law deposes and says that he now resides in Covington Township Tioga County State of Pennsylvania, that he enlisted in the military service from the County aforesaid, and was mustered into Company “F” of the 11th Pa. Cav. At Philadelphia, Penna. on the 27th day of August 1861– enlisted as a Private in said Company commanded by N. E. Calkins in the war of 1861; and was discharged October 8th, 1864; and while in the service aforesaid, and in the line of his duty, he received a wound in the right hip from a musket ball.  This on the 9th of June 1864, on the Jerusalem Plank Road, in front of Petersburg, Virginia, under the following circumstances: An attack was made on the enemy’s works, by Infantry and Cavalry; Cavalry under Gail Kouts on the extreme left, and infantry on the right of the attacking force; twelve men of Co. “D” (must be “F”) 11th Pa. Cav. were ordered forward to draw the enemy’s fire, and the said applicant, Alvin H. Ingalls, composed one of that number, and he was wounded in this charge by the enemy’s fire, by a musket ball in the right hip, which rendered him incapable of managing his horse which carried him within a few feet of the enemy’s works, where he was captured by the forces of the enemy; that he was kept a prisoner of war in Petersburg, Va. Until the 8th day of July following (1864), from which place he was carried to Richmond, and confined in Libby Prison five days, when he was taken from Libby and placed in a Hospital for prisoners in Richmond, that he left Richmond as a paroled prisoner on the 22nd day of August 1864; that he was taken to camp for paroled prisoners near Annapolis, Md.; that his time or term of enlistment expired on the 27th day of August 1864; that he remained in Camp at Annapolis, Md. until near the last of September 1864, when he was sent to Philadelphia, Pa. at Hestonville in suburbs of Philadelphia, where he waited about ten days for the arrival of his descriptive list from Annapolis, Md. when he was discharged on the 8th day of October 1864.–  That since leaving the service of the United States, he has resided near Covington, Tioga County, Penna. on a farm.–  And further that in March 1868, he made application for pension, but not having heard anything from said application, he now makes this in renewal thereof; and he hereby appoints Geo. W. Merrick, of Wellsboro, Penna. his Agent and Attorney to prosecute this his claim for invalid pension, under act of Congress presided in such cause, and to receive such certificate as may be issued for the same.

 

Signed- Alvin H. Ingalls

 

Signed in Presence of:

Geo. W. Merrick

J. O. W. Bailey

 

Affidavit of Captain B. B. Mitchell:

State of Pennsylvania

County of Bradford

On this 24th day of March 1870 before me, a Justice of the Peace, within and for the County aforesaid, B.B. Mitchell personally appeared, who being by me duly sworn according to law, says: That he resides in Troy, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, that he was Captain of Company “F” of the 11th Regt. Pa. Cavalry, that he knew and still knows Alvin H. Ingalls who was a member of the aforesaid Co. and Regt.; that said Ingalls was a true and faithful soldier and that he was seriously wounded in the right hip by a musket ball while in the line of his duty and in an attack upon the enemy on the Jerusalem Plank Road near Petersburg, Virginia, on the 9th day of June 1864 and under circumstances as follows: As we approached the enemy’s works (my Company having the advance) a detachment was ordered forward to feel the enemy, learn their strength and position with an aim to making a general attack.  To effect this the detachment was ordered to charge a line of works, behind which were several hundred men strongly entrenched.  The charge was made and the object gained, but not without severe loss to our gallant little band.  Some were killed and others wounded.  Among the latter was Alvin H. Ingalls; and a more brave or worthy soldier never entered the Army.  They charged to the very mouths of the enemy’s guns and though met by a galling and murderous fire yet they never wavered or turned back.  Alvin H. Ingalls was a prompt soldier and usually found at the head of his Company, as in this case we find him among the first and foremost in the charge.  He fell in a few feet of the enemy’s works and being severely wounded as aforesaid and no longer able to help himself was taken prisoner.  He was never able to return to duty in his Company and after laying in rebel prisons and rebel hospitals until August following (1864) was paroled and afterwards honorably discharged from the Army in which for three years he served with honor to himself and his country.  I was and have been since intimately acquainted with all the circumstances attending his wound and his disabled condition and know no reason why he is not entitled to every consideration on the part of his Country and especially is he entitled to this pension, which our Government so generously awards to its brave and loyal sons who have been crippled in its defence.  And I further certify that I have no interest in this claim for pension.

 

Signed- B.B. Mitchell

 

 

Affidavit of Alvin H. Ingalls:

Deposition A

Case of Alvin H. Ingalls, No. 116257

On this 21st day of August, 1895, at Covington, County of Tioga, State of Pa., before me, J.B. Ennis, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared Alvin H. Ingalls, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogations propounded to him during this Special Examination of aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says: P.O. Covington, Pa., age 55 years, farmer.  I enlisted in Co. F 11th Pa. Cav. enlisted Aug. 1861 discharged Oct. 8, 1864 a Corporal.  Not in any other service.  I am pensioned for gun shot wound, right hip.  I claim a pension for piles and chronic diarrhea.  I have no cause for claim for any other disability.  I was raised here, and always lived here in this immediate neighborhood till I enlisted.  My occupation was farming.  Charles Kelsey, George Johnson, Alonzo Johnson, Alfonso Youmans were my fellow workmen and associates before enlistment and live here yet.  I never was sick, except some child disease.  Never had a physician, or took a hit of doctors medicine till I went into the Army.  At enlistment I was stripped and very carefully examined.  Don’t remember the name of examining surgeon.  I think there were three surgeons making the examinations.  I have bathed with Youmans, Chas. Kelsey, and Alonzo Johnson often before the war.  Benjamin Westbrook, Andrew Brown, Andrew Klock were all present when I was examined.  Westbrook and Brown live in Mansfield, this county.  Klock lives at Liadaughton, this county.  The diarrhea first appeared while in camp at Washington D.C. soon after reaching Washington in fall of 1861.  I think I was not there more than a month till it began; we got to Washington about 28th of Aug.  I was in line of duty, doing camp duty, drilling etc.  I was treated by the regimental surgeon; the treatment was mostly Blue Mass and Quinine.  George A. Roberts, Sabinsville, Benjamin Westbrook, Andrew J. Brown – Mansfield, Andrew Klock and Capt. B.B. Mitchell of Troy, Bradford Co. Pa.  All of them, except Mitchell, were my bunk and mess mates at times and all but Roberts nearly the whole time till I was captured.  They are all living.  After we got to Fortress Monroe (in) early winter (1861-62) I had the diarrhea very bad, and at Williamsburg, Va. the summer of 1862.  That summer I was sent to General Stone Hospital in Washington D.C. on account of not being fit for duty with this diarrhea.  I was sent from White House landing, on hospital steamer Elm City.  I was sent there by direction of Dr. Harlan, our regimental Surgeon.  For some time while I was not fit for duty I had been assisting at the field hospital and regimental hospital still having the diarrhea, and one day while bandaging a wounded man’s arm I called Dr. Harlan to come quick and take the bandage – I had to run to the closet: He said “Now Ingalls you have been here long enough, you must go where you can be treated.”  That afternoon he gave me a certificate for treatment and took me to the boat himself.  He was taken prisoner on the 19th of June 1864 and was put in charge of what was called the Yankee Hospital in Petersburg, Va. and he dressed my wounds there.  I don’t recollect that he gave me treatment there for diarrhea.  I was taken to another hospital soon after he came.  After I was sent from Petersburg to Richmond, Libby Prison, I had the diarrhea bad, I was considered unable to go South (Andersonville) and they sent me to a hospital and sent those who were able to the South.  I can’t just tell where the piles did first appear.  I did not think at first that it was the piles but after they continued and got worse I then knew what it was.  The piles were the result of the diarrhea, caused by the excessive running off of the bowels.  I was never treated in the service for piles – just for the diarrhea.  Dr. Harlan lived in Philadelphia, but I don’t know whether is yet living, he was not an old man then.  I was never in invalid corps.  In my declaration filed July 17 – 1890 where I say “When my diarrhea ceased and left me with the piles”, I just mean that after I came home my diarrhea was not so bad but the piles were worse.  That declaration was written by a Justice of the Peace who was then between seventy five and eighty years of age, now dead, and did not express it right.  My own education is very limited and I could not get it any better.  The truth is the diarrhea never has been cured and troubles me a great deal yet, but it is not continuous and severe like it was in the army.  But the piles have got no better.  I keep a syringe and often even in the night have to inject laudanum in order to reduce the pain.  I say the piles did begin to effect me in fall of 1861.  I had the pain then and the itching.  I was not mustered out with the company, therefore I can’t prove my physical condition at that time by comrades.  At discharge I had the diarrhea and my rectum was turned out.  The piles were quite bad.  Immediately after discharge I came home.  Alfonso Youmans, Charles Kelsey, and Alonzo Johnson, living here, knew me right after discharge.  Dr. W.M. Barden of Mansfield this Co. treated me for both piles and diarrhea within a month of the time I got home form the army.  He treated me for about four years.  Then Dr. Henry Kilbern of Covington this Co. treated me for about fourteen years, they are both dead.  Then Dr. Hazelette treated me up to four years ago.  My present physician is Dr. Gaskill, of Covington.  I was not married when I came home.  I have resided here all the time since the war.  As to the time I have lost on account of diarrhea and piles it is hard to tell.  There are times I can do nothing and other times I can do reasonable work.  For twenty years there have been weeks at a time that I could do no work, sometimes as much as three weeks, but it bothers me all the time and hinders me about work and business, and they increase every year.  On an average I have not been able to make a half hand or more than that up to five or six years ago, and during these years I could not make near half a hand.  I have not been able to follow a plow or harrow for the past ten years, more than an hour or two in a day.  None of these disabilities have disappeared.  I have incurred no injury or disease since discharge.  I have named all the witnesses I care to have examined, I expect to prove origin in the service by Westbrook and Brown at Mansfield, Roberts at Sabinsville, Klock at Liadaughton all of this county, and B.B. Mitchell of Troy, Bradford Co. Pa.  It is doubtful whether any one can be found now who knows that I had diarrhea and piles at discharge or for some years as I was then funny(?) and only went to the doctor to expose my disabilities.  Kelsey, Johnson, and Youmans, were intimate with me as neighbors ever since discharge.  I will be present during the examinations of the witnesses nearby, but not the others.

 

Signed- Alvin H. Ingalls

Deponent

 

I had but one prescription from Dr. Robbins.  He happened to be in the drug store where I went for medicine and I consulted him and he gave a prescription.  This is the only treatment I had from him.

 

Signed- Alvin H. Ingalls

Deponent

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