NSTA – Milwaukee – October 20, 2000

Milwaukee Area Glacier Field Trip

½ Day – 87 Miles

 
Miles

 

Interval
Cumulative

 

0.0
0.0

Leave the Midwest Express Center. Travel west on I-94 to Hwy. 45.

7.0
7.0

Turn north on Hwy. 45 and continue to Silver Spring Rd.

6.7
13.7

Exit at Silver Spring Drive and turn west.

As we travel westward look for north-south ridges that we will be driving over. The rise that we see as we approach 92nd street is an example. These are recessional moraines of the Lake Michigan lobe.

4.2
17.9

After passing Lilly Road the next moraine seen also functions as a sub-continental divide. (Separating water draining to the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico

Continue on Silver Spring Drive to Marcy Road (base of the hill).

2.6
20.5

Turn north on Marcy Road

Along this area we find low lying swampy areas that are common of glacial outwash areas. This particular swamp is called a Tamarack Swamp due to the abundance of Tamarack trees to the east of Marcy Road. This tree is native to northern Wisconsin, but also found in isolated swamp areas of this type in other parts of the state. Tamaracks are a deciduous conifer. Follow Marcy Road to Mill Road.

1.0
21.5

Turn west on Mill Road

Mill Road travels east and west and goes directly over a drumlin. We are going up the steep end of the drumlin and down the gentle side. The steep end points toward the direction the ice came from and the gentle side points in the direction the ice was moving. 

1.1
22.6

When you reach the top of the drumlin stop and look to the north and south to see other drumlins in the area. Continue west on Mill Road to Lannon Road. 

0.5
23.1
  • Turn north on Lannon Road and continue into the town of Lannon. Make a note of the common building material used for the older homes, especially their basements. Continue to Good Hope Road (HWY. W). 
  • 1.0
    24.1

    Turn west and proceed to the small lannonstone quarry on the right side of the road.

    0.7
    24.8

    At the quarry we will get out of the bus and study such things as overburden (Glacial Till), bedding planes, jointing, glacial striations, and how Lannon Stone (Niagara Dolomite) is "mined". Please if you come back with your parents or by yourself get permission from the owners before entering.

    0.4
    25.2

    Exit the quarry, turn left back to Hwy 74. Turn left on Hwy. 74 to Lannon Road.

    0.3
    25.5

    Turn north on Lannon Road.

    As we travel north on Lannon road identify the typical bedrock used in building most of the homes in this area. the rock nearest the surface was used for the building of farm basements and homes years ago. It may have been bedrock or other loose rocks on the surface. About two miles north of Lannon is Menomonee Falls Park, a Waukesha County Park built on the sight of an old quarry. There is an established swimming site in part of the quarry and the rest has been stocked with fish. Traveling northward you can see the typical glacial topography. Poor drainage patterns, much marsh land, mixed between high and well drained farm land is very common.

    3.0
    28.5

    Continue north across the Waukesha-Washington County Line. 

    0.2
    28.7

    Here is an outcrop of lannon stone in which trees had been growing. This is an excellent example of physical weathering called Root-Wedging. Continue north on Lannon Road to Highway 175.

    0.9
    29.6

    Turn left on Hwy. 175.

    In this region for the next five miles there will be several sand gravel pits. At the present time sand and gravel is the most important mineral resource of Wisconsin. You can easily see how some of the pits are well maintained and others exist as junkyards for autos, trucks, and other machinery. Continue north on 175 to Hubertus Road. 

    2.7
    32.3

    Turn west (left) on Hubertus Road.

    On this road we start to enter the world famous Kettle-Moraine (interlobate) system. If you look carefully you will see a change in the building materials for the older buildings and basements. 

    0.9
    33.2

    When we reach Hubertus there are several excellent examples of this including a very old Catholic church. Continue west past Hubertus.

    0.4
    33.6

    Here we find a sand and gravel pit. We will stop here but not get out. The material you see is mainly sorted glacial till. From the bus we can see examples of differential weathering, soil profiles and the economic importance of such a deposit. Continue west on Hubertus Road. The region ahead is the interlobate moraine region. These deposits were laid down between the Lake Michigan lobe and the Green Bay lobe of the Wisconsinan glacial advance. This area is typical of "Kettle Moraine Country". Off in the distance you will be able to see Holy Hill, a glacial kame, and to the right Friese Lake, a kettle hole with its base below the water table. Continue on Hubertus Road to Plat Road (Sign and turn for the Fox and Hounds Restaurant).

    3.1
    36.7

    Turn right on Plat Road.

    0.3
    37.0

    Then left onto Hogback Road (the sign is missing so its the first left that is not somebody's driveway). On Hogback Road we will drive along a Crevasse Filling. Look down either side, the view to the left is especially good because trees are not covering the slop. The slope on these banks is about 43°. On either side of this Crevasse filling is a tamarack swamp like we saw on Marcy Road. Continue on Hogback Road to Emerald Drive. 

    1.2
    38.2

    Turn left on Emerald and continue to Donegal Road.

    0.7
    38.9

    Turn right on Donegal Road, proceed for 1.0 mile.

    1.0
    39.9

    Turn right into the back entrance to the Holy Hill parking lot (chain marked).

    0.5
    40.4

    Holy Hill is a kame. From here the region covered by the Lake Michigan lobe of the glacier can be seen to the east and the area covered by the Green Bay lobe can be seen to the north and west. Hartford, Slinger, Hustisford are in the area that was covered by the Green Bay lobe. Leaving the church parking lot we will continue north on the church drive to Highway 167 (Holy Hill Road). 

    0.5
    40.9

    Turn right on Hwy 167.

    All along Hwy 167 you can see erratics (out of place rocks), other kames, and good views of glacial deposits where the road cuts through and exposes cross-sections of till. Continue east on 167 to Highway CC. 

    1.5
    42.4

    Turn north on Highway CC to Highway 60. 

    5.2
    47.6

    Turn east on Hwy 60 to Highway 175.

    1.4
    49.0

    Turn north. Proceed to the water tower in Slinger.

    0.9
    49.9

    Turn left and park on Water Street.

    We will climb this delta kame, which is 75 feet high. At the top we will discuss its formation and the features of the area that can be seen. The gravel beds have a southerly dip of about 30° in the direction of the flow of the glacial melt waters. The area east of the kame is an abandoned glacial lake.

    Exit the same street we entered and turn left on Hwy 175 to Hwy 144. 

    0.4
    50.3

    Turn right on Hwy 144 to County AA

    0.5
    50.8

    Turn right on County AA

    As we pass Little Switzerland Ski Hill we can see well into the side of the hill. The deposits here are very well sorted indicating water deposition. Again this is a classic example why sand and gravel is so economical to "mine" in Wisconsin. Follow County AA to Hwy 41.

    0.5
    51.3

    Make a U-turn and return to Hwy. 144 and turn right

    0.5
    51.8

    Turn south on Hwy. 41 and continue to Hwy. 45 and I-94 back to the Midwest Express Center.

    34.7
    86.5

    Arrive at the Midwest Express Center. 

    Thanks for joining us and NSTA